Passive Talent Is So Obsolete [infographic] – Friday Distraction

One concept that has flown out the window since the Great Recession is employee loyalty. I believe too many employers demonstrated their lack of sensitivity during tough financial times and, as a result, employees figure they are on their own.

Of course, not all employers did this and they are reaping the benefits in terms of high employee engagement and increased talent retention.

Today’s infographic, courtesy of LinkedIn, shows us how passive candidates aren’t really as quiet as we might think. Passive candidates are those individuals currently employed that really aren’t looking for new opportunities. In the past, they were the ones that a recruiter might have to convince a little before pitching a new job. Those days might be over.

The stat that caught my eye? 47% of professionals with less than one year on the job are exploring new opportunities. That number should raise a lot of questions.

candidates, passive, passive talent, obsolete, infographic, LinkedIn, job


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Comments

  1. Tamara Collins says

    In today’s world, the passive candidate is as valuable to recruitment as the referral. Recruiters’ inboxes are often cluttered with resumes of job seekers who don’t necessarily “fit the bill”. However, by being pro-active and targeting those folks who are a “skill match” may save an organization both time and money. I am a firm believer in “leaving no stone unturned,” so I utilize various sources to find candidates. But, depending on the type of position, and if niche skills are needed, I would probably lead my Recruitment Strategy with a more targeted approach.

  2. JD says

    Well I’m definitely an active job seeker. For the past month I have been updating my process for creating resumes and cover letters, creating cold-call email and phone scripts, and doing what I can to clean up for a dream HR analyst position.

    I’m practicing cold email-call-email-snail mail and focusing on HR managers. Do you have any advice on effective cold calling (other than persistence)?